Reflecting on Our Education Arcade Continued ..

The most exciting game for me to play was the remake of the game Deal or No Deal — in our arcade — called Find The Ace:

Though it was quite simple, it was the thrill of pulling the playing cards out the envelopes that made it so exciting and fun. The dealer was being cheap with the deals though. I was down to two envelopes. I had a 50/50 chance of getting the ace and my offer was ONLY 5 tickets to walk away. 5 tickets!! No way!

One thing though, I never quite knew what the lesson in the game was. My excitement just took over me and I never stopped to think what that could be.

I am not one who likes to give criticism, even if it is constructive, but the Professor is making me in this case!

Adder All was a game that I enjoyed playing as well. I am horrible at math, but having to figure out the solution to the problems before it hit the bottom got my blood flowing and  I could barely sit still in the chair. I’m making this statement unaware of what effort it might take to have a math program like that run smoothly, but I don’t think this particular game in our Education Arcade required much “building”. It was “techy” and that was cool, but maybe it was one of the easier ways out.

All in all, great turnout for the arcade with such little Makers time. The prize table and tickets were the icing on it all. Everyone did great! Good job guys!

 

 

 

The expectations I had for the class were exactly the opposite of what I went through this winter semester. I thought the class would revolve around learning about computers, their parts and how they function – sort of like the introduction course. I had no idea what I was stepping into the first day of class.

I was expecting it to be a drag, honestly. I was just ready to get in and get out in three short weeks. I think this was mainly because I was pretty bummed about not being able to enjoy my winter break, but instead being in York College for four seasons straight.

(Spring ’12, Summer ’12, Fall ’13 and Winter ’13).

I can say I also wasn’t excited about the class being focused around blogging. My face dropped when I heard that on the first day and I knew it would be a long three weeks. This was my thought  in the beginning of the class, but it ended up being something interesting and great. I wasn’t thrilled about having to post blogs and sit for time after time commenting on as many posts from my classmates as I could. I barely like to sit in front of my Mac to check emails for ten minutes. It blew my mind to think that I would have to be faced with a computer screen for four hours and then some extra hours at home for three weeks.

The class ended up being very exciting and with it revolving around the making of the Education Arcade, I got to interact with my classmates and I feel we were all pretty close at the end of the course. Making the arcade brought us together. I have a new found respect for blogging and bloggers. It seems like blogging is just like writing, like it would flow so easily, but blogging took more thought than I expected. Even though, I can’t see it as something I’d do outside of the classroom, I appreciate how bloggers keep us, non bloggers, in tune.

My favorite non-game oriented assignment had to be the few that were based around DS106 Digital Storytelling. Even though it was EXTREMELY frustrating trying to figure out how to edit and all, at the end when I finally got it, it was so much fun. When it comes to the visual and design assignments, you can really tweak anything you want! It’s amazing!

I’ve been showing my finished product to everyone I know because I was so amazed with being able to get it done.

I’m so proud of the work I accomplished this semester. Not to mention our Wiz Professor who helped answer my billions of questions and told me I will not give up – when I sure did want to.

What would I change about this class?

Easy, less time in front of the computer. Haha. No, but honestly, I would like it if we spoke more in group. It would help clarify some of the difficulties with assignments, but it would also allow us to share ideas with one another. It could act like the brainstorm before blogging. We were only able to do that right before building for the Education Arcade.

In all, I really enjoyed this winter class and appreciated that it took me out of my element. I explored technology and got to get in touch with my creative, imaginative kid side!

So I want to say Thank You to everyone. AC 230 was a really enjoyable class!

Reflecting on Our Education Arcade

Education Arcade – Real Prizes

My Academic Computing 230 class just wrapped up its Education Arcade full of great games, great people and even greater prizes! While most of the games revolved around the subject of Mathematics, my game was a different kind.  It was so much fun! Check out a player taking a shot at my game Make A Meal.

My classmate was such a great sport! Tons of fun.

I would say my game was a combination of both skill and luck. You could see in the video the Professor made a joke saying that my game required serious athletic ability which isn’t necessarily true, but it sure was a funny line. If it happened to be that the player of the game had great aim and was athletic, it might be easier for him or her to get the ring around the bottles. That’s where I can see the element of skill fitting in. On the other had, if a contestant decided to come and play my game and they didn’t have much hand-eye coordination amongst other things, then the concept of making a meal would be a lot harder to accomplish. This is why I say that the game involves some luck as well because with this kind of contestant, they’d have to just toss it and hope and pray it landed around the body of a bottle with the correct label. Therefore, whether my game is of luck or pure skill depends on the player.

Everyone who came around to play my game seemed very excited about the action component it involved. It was also very exciting because the players panicked a little every time the amount of tosses they had went down as they still hadn’t completed their meal. One thing I heard a lot was that my game was pretty hard. I don’t know if that was said jokingly, but  I hope so. After hearing that once or twice, I started modifying my game. I gave each player more tosses so instead of 6, maybe I gave them 8 and I gave the children about 10. Another thing I did was move the line closer and at certain times, I rearranged my bottles by spreading them out so the ring had a greater chance of not being obstructed by a bottle nearby.

Even though I thought my game was more steered towards showcasing knowledge, I think it also allowed players to construct knowledge about which foods belonged in certain food groups. As an example, I’ll use something I observed during the Arcade. I asked a player to make a meal using fruits, but no vegetables and she tossed the ring around the bottle labeled “carrot”. With her making that mistake, I got to explain to her that the carrot is a part of the vegetable food group as she thought it was a fruit. So with players placing wrong foods in the food groups, it allowed them to learn the lesson by playing. After that, some of the same players who made mistakes came back around to play Build A Meal again to get it right. Now that’s learning.

Other than some minor things, I would keep my game the way it was. I would change the labels I made. Because I wrote them with the only marker I could find at the time, silver, it was hard for some of the players to search out the meats and other products in the game. The bright light reflecting off of the metallic marker made it worse for them as well. Something else I would change is the ring. I would have loved to purchase an actual ring, multiple as well so that I didn’t have to go fetch the ring after every toss. This would also help keep track of how many tosses the player already took. I was keeping count with my fingers while trying to remember which parts of the meal were made already. I think my particular game was pretty fast paced so maybe I would like to give each player more chances at making meals, more than 6 tosses to slow it down.

The silly moves (tosses) with my game made it very playful and full of laughs and I think that is one very important part of an arcade, having fun. In our case – being able to be a kid!

Because I feel this post is getting too long – check out Part II of this post as I’ll comment on some of my classmates’ games and reflect on the class (: