Lets twist it up

As a teacher I think some of these assignments on DS106. I would use Design assignment, Messing with the MacGuffin to create a assignment geard towards 3rd grade class. Where they would take their favorite book. Look through the book and find a picture and find something about the story they would change. Preferably a line that the character says. Have them change that line, I wold let them know that whatever line they changed needed to alter the storyline. This would be a assignment I would use to explain storyline and plot. I would use a fairy tale picture as my example.

Now, this would only be part one of the assignment part 2 would be for them to them re write the story using the twist they added to the story.  Then I would have them record their revised story for everyone else to hear. Here is my story

http://vocaroo.com/i/s0sQdQZM5OO9

This would be a lesson I would use to explain storyline and elements of a story.

This assignment didn’t take too long to create, the picture I used a google image and then I used roflbot to add the text to the picture. Then I found my storybook, Disney’s Storybook Collection and used the Snow White and the seven dwarfs story. When I got to the part of the story with the poison apple I wrote down the ending that i created adding my twist.

Then I recorded myself telling the story using Vocaroo. to record the story then I saved the recording and added the link to my post.

I think the students would love this assignment. It allows them to use their imagination. I think I would alter this assignment maybe allowing them to used it to change history. Allowing them to pick a point in history they could change or alter. I think that would be exciting for them.

Hey now Hey now Don’t dream it’s over!!!

First of all let me say that this was a fun class and I’m glad I decided to take it when I did (even though my wallet wasn’t very happy with me when I had registered).

Now on to some Q and A. My game was mainly based on chance. I made it this way so that everyone would have an equal chance at being successful. I even made sure that I didnt even know where the cards were put so that I would not be able to give away anything through unconcsious gestures and shared genuine disappointment and excitement with the player. The game both required basic knowlede of probability and predictbale outcomes, but also taught it as well. I really encourage each contestant to think hard about their chances of winning more tickets then I would offer them (although many just refused and made me pull more envelopes cough cough… like Anthony). There were times when I would explain the odds to the player instead of letting them figure it out for themselves, but other then that the game went as I expected. Constructing it was simple although I had to teach myself how to color in the lines again which has never been more best ability.

I enjoyed seeing how creative other people were with their games. One of my favorite games was the adding computer game. Once I saw there was a high score I immediately saw it as a video game and didn’t even think about the education factor. Such a simple concept that I could see a lot of kids getting into. I also want to give a special shout out to the awesome switch operated spinning wheel on the fraction game. That was awesome!

As a general criticism I would suggest that every game had a chance to win even if you were bad at it. Mainly because I am a sore loser.

Honestly when registering for this class I had no idea of what to expect. I think it’s great that the class is constantly changing because our world and technology are constantly changing. My favorite non arcade assignment would have to be the researching of bloggers. At first I thought it was crazy for a physical educator to need technology but after researching I found a lot of useful outlets and have even considered creating a twitter account to easier access the information thats being shared over the world wide web.

In closing I’d like to say my favorite parting words… It’s been real.

Pop Some Math

The lesson Plan for math that I had in mind was more or less helping students to memorize their multiplication tables. This lesson plan is built over the course of a few days.It begins first in making an attempt to evaluate what the student already knows and has previously memorized.  This includes their, 0’s,1’s,2’s,5’s,10’s,11’s. Once these tables have been taught through repetition and practice the next phase is implemented, the 3’s and 9’s time table using the different activities mentioned in the lesson plan. Drill all these problems into their heads and make it almost like second nature. The last step is to create a 5min. timed quiz for the students to test their knowledge, 100 problems. Next and final step would be tying everything together.

This is where my game would come into play. Instead of using the traditional method of a drill sheet why not make a game where the students can reinforce their multiplication skills and pop some balloons. I would explain the the children the concept of the game and have each student spin at least once. We would do a few as a class no paper or pencil.  I wasn’t able to create a mock up of the game because it included so many elements. I took a while to build and it wasn’t finished till the day of the arcade.

I changed the rules form have the students give me all the possible combinations for the number on the wheel to only ave to come up with one. The biggest feed back I got was ion the non-popping balloons. Some suggested I use something else entirely but most said just make the balloons bigger so they can pop. However, I realize were could not conduct this game in an actual classroom due to the use of sharp objects. But the point of the game is clear.

Creation with a Pop

I have to say I went through quite a few ideas in the creation of this game. I originally wanted to create a video game for English. I realized, very very early, that that was’nt going to be possible at all. Next I though of using the wack the mole game to teach multiplication but quickly realized that that was also something that I just wasn’t equip to build. Then when discussing it in class I had realized that maybe wacking wasn’t the only action I could use to make my game fun.

I though of something else that children love, balloons. What better way to teach the kids but by allowing the to destroy them, pop them. So I decided that instead of doing a typical drill where where a combination of numbers, from 1 through 12 are placed together through multiplication  and asking for he answer, why not give the player the answer and have them give me the multiplication problem. So started by listing all the possible multiplication answers from the 1 to 12 times table. Then I wote down all the possible multiplication answers for each number I listed.

Next it was time to make the wheel. I got a plate from the 99 cent store and counted all the numbers I needed to place on the wheel (59), the number was uneven so added another space to the wheel, you win. I then used post its to write the #’s on the plate

what came next was the board itself. I used a decent size box and took it apart. I used to top panel for the directions.

the Next two panels I cut out twelve holes and brought some number magnets that I pasted above each hole. Once that was done I cut out the conors of some smaller boxes and pased then to back of each hole. This little “cup” would hold the balloon. the last panel I used as a stand t hold the base of the board up. The last step was to blow up the balloons. I blew up 90 balloons, didn’t even use half but at least I was prepared. This was the final product.

 

 

 

Multi- Pop

[youtube]http://youtu.be/5_UmA7bLXCU[/youtube]

My game was 98% skill and 2% chance. It consisted of knowing your multiplication skills. Being able to use the numbers 1 through 12 to figure out what two numbers on the board, when multiplied, gives you the number they spun on the wheel. Also, because they only had 30 seconds to figure it out there was a element of speed that was implemented, another skill. However, there was a hint of chance in my game, if you spun the wheel and landed on you win he player would have received 10 tickets without even answering a question.

I think people responded well the the style of the game. They wanted to play and realized, quickly that it wasn’t as easy as they thought it would be. Some of the kids were stuck on certain numbers and couldn’t come up with a combination.

My game was truly a showcase of knowledge game. It didn’t require students to learn much. However, in the end they would learn whether or not they really knew there required multiplication tables (1 through 12 table).

The mechanics of the game I feel were good. The mechanical areas of the game is what I would have changed. The board wasn’t very stable at all that was something I was most disappointed in. Another major issue I encountered was the fact that he balloons were not big enough to pop. This took most of the fun out of the game, I felt. I would have liked to work that out before the day we presented the games.The only rule I would have, and technically did change, was the one about popping ALL possible combinations. That rule I altered decided as long as the player gave me one they could win some tickets.

One of my favorite games was Find the Ace. I enjoyed that it was the complete opposite of my game, all chance. Iliked that it was a spn off of Deal or No Deal. The game was exciting, it gave suspense and was fun to play. However, out of all the games I played Physical Fitness Plinko was one that could have used a slight change. I loved the Plinko board and the way in which you won the tokens to play on the board but I didn’t like the structure of the rules at the beginning. For one the definitions written on the card needed to be more legible. Two, I feel each player should have received maybe 50 or 60 seconds to place the definitions in the right spot. Third the fact the the player was handed the definitions kind of slowed down a part of the game that as suppose to be speedy. Other than that the game was awesome!

I loved this class. My expectation was that it was going to be computer based with exams on how to operate programs and technical devices. I was happy to see the class was not like that at all. Having the class goal be an arcade game for students to play to help them learn was a fantastic idea. I feel it taught us, as teachers, to be open to the idea that chalk, notes and textbook readings aren’t always as effective in teaching as making learning fun. We have to add technology and it isn’t limited to computers technology can be anything, any tool, that isn’t text based.

My favorite assignment this class was the maker Research Assignment. I found MOOC’s to be so interesting. Learning how they worked, what their goal was originally and how that goal changed over time. I was interested in all the problems that contributed t the POSSIBLE demise of MOOC’s as a creditable way to earn a degree. I would change this class by NOT making it a winter course but rather a regular semester course. I think that would allow students to really create an amazing game that would not only be fun an learning oriented but one tht they could later implement in their own classroom.

Post Game Wrap-up

For the Education Arcade I originally planned to build a game that had a constantly rotating board, which meant it required a motor. The idea of that was so daunting to me that I eventually gave up on it, only to find that ‘s clever son actually managed to motorize her board game! I wound up building Adder-All, an adding game, with software using Microsoft’s Silverlight platform.

I really did want to make a learning game, but settled for a game that required the player have a preexisting knowledge of how to add. I thought if I wasn’t going to teach something, I could at least try to make a game that sharpened a skill they already had.

In Adder-All, the player essentially had to add two numbers (under 100 each). So, it was mostly a game of skill, the only luck factor being that the numbers were random, so it was completely possible to get a lot of simple problems, like 10+0, 1+1, etc. The players definitely showed signs of relief when the simple problems popped up.

Adder-All allowed players to really showcase their addition skills. Unlike the games like Snake Holes where players had to progressively use reason to make sensible determinations, my game relied fully on what they were bringing to the table.

The mechanics of the game were too fast, and often quirky. 60% of the players scored over 1,000 points (about 10-15 correct answers with 10 lives), but that means 40% didn’t. So I knew I had made the pace of the game too fast, too quickly.

It was buggy too, it froze a few times, and didn’t behave the way it did as on the computer I wrote it on (you have to click on the game after entering your name for example). These bugs caused players to lose lives, the game, and even stopped one of the kids from playing at all. At those times I wished I had a physical game that I could mend on the spot, but the best I could do was go out of server for a few minutes to update the Silverlight plugin to the latest version. Unfortunately, that didn’t help.

If I could do it again I would slow things down a bit and add some more features, like powerups to freeze time or get extra lives. Ideally I would have ended the game with a review lesson of the problems the players got wrong, perhaps with tips on how to solve them more quickly.

The Education Arcade experience, and AC 230 itself, were wonderful experiences for me, totally exceeding my expectations. I was expecting that I would learn how effectively present information, in PowerPoint or something. But it turned out that I was learning how to think about much bigger ideas, like building, and using creativity as a means to a goal. Most of all, I was happy to find that it was all fun. Plus, it was great being around people who have dreams of being educators. I tried to feed of their desires to want to share their knowledge, and their openness to learning new things through such unconventional methods as building our own Caine’s Arcade.

In regards to the course description, I don’t think I would change anything about the class. I was intrigued by how Prof. Smith was using the Web 2.0 to join in and participate in like-minded networks. I wish we learned more about how to discover, and be a part of our own niches, on the web. Perhaps that’s best left for a course of its own though.

When I’m ready to find my niche, I’m definitely now keen on blogging and will likely be doing so. And if such a course exists by then, sign me up!

 

P.S. If anyone starts a blog, be sure to let me know. I would love to follow it.

Reflecting on Our Education Arcade Continued ..

The most exciting game for me to play was the remake of the game Deal or No Deal — in our arcade — called Find The Ace:

Though it was quite simple, it was the thrill of pulling the playing cards out the envelopes that made it so exciting and fun. The dealer was being cheap with the deals though. I was down to two envelopes. I had a 50/50 chance of getting the ace and my offer was ONLY 5 tickets to walk away. 5 tickets!! No way!

One thing though, I never quite knew what the lesson in the game was. My excitement just took over me and I never stopped to think what that could be.

I am not one who likes to give criticism, even if it is constructive, but the Professor is making me in this case!

Adder All was a game that I enjoyed playing as well. I am horrible at math, but having to figure out the solution to the problems before it hit the bottom got my blood flowing and  I could barely sit still in the chair. I’m making this statement unaware of what effort it might take to have a math program like that run smoothly, but I don’t think this particular game in our Education Arcade required much “building”. It was “techy” and that was cool, but maybe it was one of the easier ways out.

All in all, great turnout for the arcade with such little Makers time. The prize table and tickets were the icing on it all. Everyone did great! Good job guys!

 

 

 

The expectations I had for the class were exactly the opposite of what I went through this winter semester. I thought the class would revolve around learning about computers, their parts and how they function – sort of like the introduction course. I had no idea what I was stepping into the first day of class.

I was expecting it to be a drag, honestly. I was just ready to get in and get out in three short weeks. I think this was mainly because I was pretty bummed about not being able to enjoy my winter break, but instead being in York College for four seasons straight.

(Spring ’12, Summer ’12, Fall ’13 and Winter ’13).

I can say I also wasn’t excited about the class being focused around blogging. My face dropped when I heard that on the first day and I knew it would be a long three weeks. This was my thought  in the beginning of the class, but it ended up being something interesting and great. I wasn’t thrilled about having to post blogs and sit for time after time commenting on as many posts from my classmates as I could. I barely like to sit in front of my Mac to check emails for ten minutes. It blew my mind to think that I would have to be faced with a computer screen for four hours and then some extra hours at home for three weeks.

The class ended up being very exciting and with it revolving around the making of the Education Arcade, I got to interact with my classmates and I feel we were all pretty close at the end of the course. Making the arcade brought us together. I have a new found respect for blogging and bloggers. It seems like blogging is just like writing, like it would flow so easily, but blogging took more thought than I expected. Even though, I can’t see it as something I’d do outside of the classroom, I appreciate how bloggers keep us, non bloggers, in tune.

My favorite non-game oriented assignment had to be the few that were based around DS106 Digital Storytelling. Even though it was EXTREMELY frustrating trying to figure out how to edit and all, at the end when I finally got it, it was so much fun. When it comes to the visual and design assignments, you can really tweak anything you want! It’s amazing!

I’ve been showing my finished product to everyone I know because I was so amazed with being able to get it done.

I’m so proud of the work I accomplished this semester. Not to mention our Wiz Professor who helped answer my billions of questions and told me I will not give up – when I sure did want to.

What would I change about this class?

Easy, less time in front of the computer. Haha. No, but honestly, I would like it if we spoke more in group. It would help clarify some of the difficulties with assignments, but it would also allow us to share ideas with one another. It could act like the brainstorm before blogging. We were only able to do that right before building for the Education Arcade.

In all, I really enjoyed this winter class and appreciated that it took me out of my element. I explored technology and got to get in touch with my creative, imaginative kid side!

So I want to say Thank You to everyone. AC 230 was a really enjoyable class!

Reflecting Back to an Educational Arcade

Our Arcade Prizes

1- Was your game one of chance or skill or a combination of both? How did people respond to the style of play?

My Game- “Bingo Speed” was a game that was a combination of both chance and skills. The reason I say this it is because for the “chance” part ANY one of the contestants can get a Bingo first because the number problems are the same on each given bingo cards except just scattered at different places. The number that gets chosen on the spinner board is on everyone’s Bingo card but just one can get a Bingo before the other. The skill part is giving them the importance of mathematics. The addition they have a knowledge of but when playing my game, you have to be thinking very fast because each number spun on the wheel only gives you 10 seconds to be able to find the problem on your Bingo card to place the chip on.

2- Did your game allow for players to construct knowledge (through play they learned the lesson) or was it more of a showcase of knowledge (asking players for answers to questions would be a good example)?

My game did not allow for players to construct knowledge because through playing Bingo Speed, they did not learn addition rather just learn to be able to add faster.

3- How did the mechanics of the game turn out? Was it slow, fast, cumbersome, just right. Same with the rules. What would you change and why?

The mechanics of my game turned out pretty well but at times my spinner would give me a little problem (or maybe it was just my finger-tired from flickering the arrow so much).  Although, it was able to get all bingo rounds done neat. It worked well in a steady way- it wasn’t neither too slow nor too fast. I think me counting up to 10 seconds was a little annoying since it would distract people. What I would like to change about the game is to get a better spinner ( Get Shaira’s Son to make me an electronic version! 🙂 ) and also to get a stop watch or something for the 10 seconds period.

AC 230 Reflecting Back.

My Academic Computing class was very educational and fun. It was totally different from what I had expected the class to be- in a good way. When I had registered for the class, I expected the class to be very computer relating knowledge although it was but it was far more than just that. I can honestly say I learned a lot from the class- Blogging, Making Tutorials, Editing pictures, Fixing image size using pixlr, Making Videos, Mocking games, Building our own game, Connecting with our peers and those of our field related “role models” and most importantly having fun through it all. Who could have possibly say they learned all these stuff in just about 4 weeks! I love the way Professor Smith had designed the class for us, it was truly amazing to have him as our Professor for AC230. Thank you for all your support and feed-backs Professor! My favorite assignment was the “Network Assignment” – it taught me a lot and gave me the opportunity to look across the web for a blogger who’s ideas and blog post would help me when becoming a teacher. I was able to find a great blog page of Mr. Yang- his postings are so recent and interesting to read. He adds  tips and lessons on how to prepare oneself when becoming a teacher. The constructing of arcade was a lot of fun; much more then I had expected it to be. I got to be a kid again and become crazily creative. I would not want to change anything about the class but if possible- if students want to create a really great arcade game, can they work in groups? I think this would allow them to build something much stronger and better. The knowledge I received from this class, I would be looking back at it in helping me become a better teacher in the future.

 

COIN SKEE

Coin Skee was inspired by the my childhood favorite Skee Ball, the main goal of my game was to get the ball in the hole and each hole represented pennies, nickels and dimes. If the player got it in the penny slot he or she would have to make twenty cents out of pennies, if the player made it in the nickel slot they would have to make twenty cents out of nickels and the dime slot they would have to make twenty cents out of dimes. My game was basically built for a younger age group. this game helps familiarize them with counting and understanding the concept of money.

coins

Coin Skee was a combination of both skill and knowledge, it tested peoples ability to aim and face a little challenge, as for knowledge, definitely tested those counting skills for some. I believe people had fun and found the style of playing, interesting and exciting. The players actually lean when they win the game, because when they win they have the opportunity to count using images of pennies, nickels and dimes. So they had to showcase their knowledge and was able to take their time.

The mechanics of the game turned out perfectly fine with me, I would probably tweet certain things here and there, but over all i tried my best, i was actually anxious to build my version of a skee ball machine. The things I would change, would probably be the appearance, it wasn’t what I visualized, I think I wanted more visual stimulation like color even lights! As for the rules, I would keep the same concept but change it by laying out the coins so the students can pick out the coins and help identify pennies, nickels and dimes

 

[youtube]http://youtu.be/Y6f44Ja8X6I[/youtube]

 

Reflection

This class was by far the most interesting class I’ve ever had! It was different and for this short three weeks I felt so connected to the field of childhood education and what it has to offer. As for the blogging, I’ve officially became a fan, it felt good promoting my thoughts and projects to web and the class. I was so into the blogging that I posted our class link onto my Facebook and got some interesting feed back from friends and family, they actually enjoyed reading our posts. I wish I had more classes like this simply because it made you think and work from a different perspective, NOT your traditional “open the book, read the book, and take the test” routine!

Arcade Day! :)

[youtube]http://youtu.be/uw-ivhiOKr0[/youtube]

The arcade day was a complete success! My Rhyme-A-Dime game is a game of both, chance and skill because the dime has 3 chances of landing on the correct slot and need to have a sliding skill as well as know how to rhyme the chosen word. Players responded to this game as a lesson learned through play since you first need to find the word that rhymes with the word on the dime. The mechanics of the game turned put great because players were able to make the correct slots. Something I would change about this game is the size of the ramp because to make certain slots, the ramp would get in the way and it’s large size was not very necessary. I would also change the amount of chances one can slide the dime, I only gave 3 chances for each word, but if given more then I would’ve had more winners.

My favorite arcade game in the class has to be the “Aim and Build It Healthy.” I enjoyed playing this game the most because I loved the idea of incorporating throwing a ball to a board which contains healthy food drawings and I got the ball in the correct section almost at every attempt. The mechanics and rules were simple and creative as well. I believe this game can teach young students how to determine healthy food from unhealthy.

A game that I think could use some improvement is the “Finding Factors” game because the rules seemed confusing. When I played this game at the arcade I had to ask many questions and when I spun the spinner I landed on high products. This made it hard for me to divide all the pasta into the correct number of bowls. Also a lot more space was needed to focus on the factors I was working with. So to improve this game, I would suggest using smaller products so that dividing the pasta can be easier and I felt like the amount of time was not enough to divide everything.

I thought this class would be difficult since there were only three weeks to complete the course, but it actually turned out to be an interesting experience. It was my first time blogging and this class has helped me discover how much fun it is to share my point of view on different topics. I actually enjoyed the class since it was designed around constructing the arcade which is extremely unique and this assignment taught me to be creative with education which is really important to keep in mind. My favorite non-game oriented assignment has to be the tutorial one because I explained each step of something I enjoyed making. I would not like to change this class in any way, but would rather recommend it to other students. This professor knows how to make learning fun! Thanks for an interesting winter session!